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heart diseases affecting the youngWith India close to becoming the number one destination for heart diseases, now even young Indians are falling prey to heart diseases. Longer working hours, unhealthy eating habits and major lifestyle changes are leading us towards the ominous position of being the only nation in the entire world which will contribute for about 60% of all heart diseases patients by the year 2015!

In a study conducted by Merwin Hosptial, Hyderabad it has been  found that 50% Indians suffer from their first heart attack before the age of 50 and 25% suffer from their first heart attack by the age of 40! So what really are the reasons for these alarming figures and heart diseases affecting the younger population of India?

To know more, click here…

heart diseases plaguing indiansThe sudden death of Indian origin, UK labour MP, Ashok Kumar due to an ischemic heart condition has once again put the spot light on heart diseases that are plaguing Indians! We Indians fall in the South East Asian belt which is notoriously weak hearted. For examples sake, in the year 2000, more than half of the 16.7 million heart disease related deaths occurred in South Asia alone. Another report to reiterate the fact that we as Indians are becoming more and more susceptible to heart diseases, is that India is expected to lose around 2 million people to coronary deaths by the year 2010.

What do these numbers and sudden deaths of seemingly fit Indians, as in the case of SAP CEO Ranjan Das highlight? The answer though seemingly simple is quite disturbing, these news and alarming facts point towards a trend which is seeing more and more Indians falling prey to heart diseases! Reasons being changing lifestyles and diet structures along with lack of physical activity and the genetic make-up; while not much can be done about our genes that showcase inherent lipid abnormality which greatly increases our chances of suffering from heart diseases. (However experts have added that poor lipid levels can be modified by the intake of a proper well balanced diet.) In a recent study designed by Apollo hospital and conducted by IMRB, it was found that 40% of Indians were at a high or moderate risk of a heart disease.

With the dice being so loaded against us, what do we do to prevent heart diseases? Following are some simple guidelines that will help us to prevent the occurrence of heart diseases in ourselves!

  • SMOKERS – whether of cigarettes, pipes or cigars – are more than twice at risk of a heart attack than non-smokers.

Studies have found that even one to two cigarettes a day greatly increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular conditions. Non-smokers who are exposed to constant smoke also have an increased risk. If you quit smoking, the health benefits start almost immediately, and within a few years, your risk of stroke and coronary artery disease becomes similar to non-smokers’.

  • EXCESSIVE lipids (fatty substances including cholesterol and triglycerides), especially in the form of LDL cholesterol, cause the build-up of fatty deposits within your arteries, reducing or blocking the flow of blood and oxygen to your heart.There is a sharp increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease when total cholesterol levels are 240 mg/dl and above. Aim for a total cholesterol level of less than 200 mg/dl. LDL cholesterol should be less than 70 mg/dl for patients at very high risk of cardiovascular disease. For all others, LDL cholesterol should be less than 130 mg/dl.

Triglyceride is a form of fat. People with high triglycerides often have a high total cholesterol level, including high LDL (bad) cholesterol and low HDL (good) cholesterol levels. Triglyceride levels should be kept below 150 mg/dl. It is recommended that you have your cholesterol level checked as early as age 20 or earlier if you have a family history of high cholesterol. The cholesterol profile includes an evaluation of total cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglyceride levels. HDL cholesterol takes the LDL (bad) cholesterol away from the arteries and back to the liver, where it can be passed out of the body. High levels of HDL seem to protect against cardiovascular disease.Aim for HDL levels greater than 40 mg/dl; the higher the HDL level, the better. An HDL of 60 mg/dl and above is considered protective against heart disease.

BLOOD pressure measures the pressure or force inside your arteries with each heartbeat.

High blood pressure increases the workload of the heart and kidneys, increasing the risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke and kidney disease. Aim for a reading of 120/80 mmHg or lower (high blood pressure is 140/90 or higher). Control blood pressure through diet, exercise, weight management and, if needed, medication. DIABETES occurs when the body is unable to produce insulin or use the insulin it has. This results in elevated blood sugar levels. Those with diabetes have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease because diabetes increases other risk factors, such as high cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides; lower HDL; and high blood pressure.

Keeping diabetes under control is essential in reducing your risk. The more you weigh, the harder your heart has to work to give your body nutrients. Research shows that being overweight contributes to the onset of cardiovascular disease. Excess weight also raises blood cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure, lowers HDL cholesterol and increases the risk of diabetes.

  • VEGETABLES and fruit are high in vitamins, minerals and fibre – and low in calories.

Eating a variety of fruit and vegetables may help you control your weight and your blood pressure. Unrefined whole-grain food contains fibre that can help lower your blood cholesterol and help you feel full, which may help you manage your weight. Eat fish at least twice a week. Recent research shows that eating oily fish containing omega-3 fatty acids (for example, salmon, trout and herring) may help lower your risk of death from coronary artery disease.

Choose lean meat and poultry without skin and prepare them without added saturated and trans fat.

  • THE heart is like any other muscle – it needs a workout to stay strong and healthy. Exercising helps improve how well the heart pumps blood through your body. Aim for moderate exercise 30 minutes a day, on most days.

Exercise should be aerobic, involving the large muscle groups. Aerobic activities include brisk walking, cycling, swimming, jumping rope and jogging. However, consult your doctor before starting any exercise programme.

Sources: Hyderabad News, TOI.

heartFormer U.S. president Bill Clinton recently underwent surgery for a heart procedure. The 63 year old, was admitted to the New York-Presbyterian Hospital for the placement of two stents in a coronary artery! While the news came as a shock to the world, it was a routine procedure for the doctors at the hospital, as Clinton had earlier undergone a quadruple bypass surgery at the same hospital in 2004.

This news made headlines because it was the former president of the USA, who underwent a heart surgery. But did you know that the WHO (World Health Organization) has predicted that India is going to account for 60% of the entire world’s cardiac patients by this current year! The reason being, India falls under the group of South East Asian countries belt, which are notorious for having elevated levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while also suffering from a deficiency in HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol, which helps clear fatty buildups from blood vessels).

 Not only this, but we also tended to gain weight around the abdominal region thereby, greatly increasing our risk of heart disease. Other factors include low birth weight and malnutrition which increases our risk of diabetes and heart attacks in adulthood! So how does one identify the symptoms, which can lead to a heart disease? Following are 12 possible heart symptoms that one shouldn’t ignore:

12 Possible Heart Symptoms Never to Ignore

Here are a dozen symptoms that may signal heart trouble.

1. Anxiety. Heart attack can cause intense anxiety or a fear of death. Heart attack survivors often talk about having experienced a sense of "impending doom."

2. Chest discomfort. Pain in the chest is the classic symptom of heart attack, and "the No. 1 symptom that we typically look for," says Jean C. McSweeney, PhD, RN, associate dean for research at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing in Little Rock and a pioneer in research on heart symptoms in women. But not all heart attacks cause chest pain, and chest pain can stem from ailments that have nothing to do with the heart.

Heart-related chest pain is often centered under the breastbone, perhaps a little to the left of center. The pain has been likened to "an elephant sitting on the chest," but it can also be an uncomfortable sensation of pressure, squeezing, or fullness. "It's not unusual for women to describe the pain as a minor ache," McSweeney says.

Women, more so than men, can also experience a burning sensation in their chest, rather than a pressure or pain. "Sometimes people make the mistake that the pain comes from a stomach problem," says Nieca Goldberg, MD, clinical associate professor of medicine at the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City and another expert on women's heart symptoms.

3. Cough. Persistent coughing or wheezing can be a symptom of heart failure -- a result of fluid accumulation in the lungs. In some cases, people with heart failure cough up bloody phlegm.

4. Dizziness. Heart attacks can cause lightheadedness and loss of consciousness. So can potentially dangerous heart rhythm abnormalities known as arrhythmias.

5. Fatigue. Especially among women, unusual fatigue can occur during a heart attack as well as in the days and weeks leading up to one. And feeling tired all the time may be a symptom of heart failure. Of course, you can also feel tired or fatigued for other reasons too! But it is better to clear up the reasons for feeling fatigue all the time, with your doctor.

6. Nausea or lack of appetite. It's not uncommon for people to feel sick to their stomach or throw up during a heart attack. And abdominal swelling associated with heart failure can interfere with appetite.

7. Pain in other parts of the body. In many heart attacks, pain begins in the chest and spreads to the shoulders, arms, elbows, back, neck, jaw, or abdomen. But sometimes there is no chest pain -- just pain in these other body areas. The pain might come and go. Men having a heart attack often feel pain in the left arm. In women, the pain is more likely to be felt in both arms, or between the shoulder blades.

8. Rapid or irregular pulse. Doctors say that there's nothing worrisome about an occasional skipped heartbeat. But a rapid or irregular pulse -- especially when accompanied by weakness, dizziness, or shortness of breath -- can be evidence of a heart attack, heart failure, or an arrhythmia. Left untreated, some arrhythmias can lead to stroke, heart failure, or sudden death.

9. Shortness of breath. People who feel winded at rest or with minimal exertion might have a pulmonary condition like asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). But breathlessness could also indicate a heart attack or heart failure. "Sometimes people having a heart attack don't have chest pressure or pain but feel extremely short of breath," Goldberg says. "It's like they've just run a marathon when they haven't even moved." During a heart attack, shortness of breath often accompanies chest discomfort, but it can also occur before or without chest discomfort.

10. Sweating. Breaking out in a cold sweat is a common symptom of heart attack. "You might just be sitting in a chair when all of a sudden you are really sweating like you had just worked out," Frid says.

11. Swelling. Heart failure can cause fluid to accumulate in the body. This can cause swelling (often in the feet, ankles, legs, or abdomen) as well as sudden weight gain and sometimes a loss of appetite.

12. Weakness. In the days leading up to a heart attack, as well as during one, some people experience severe, unexplained weakness

Sources: WebMD and Express Healthcare Management.

 
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